Small-scale kitchen gardens and container gardening are the most efficient tools to provide fresh food

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Sacks gardening in urban and rural areas

Published on 25 Feb, 2010 12:22 pm

by Prof. Dr. Willem Van Cotthem – Ghent University (Belgium)

http://scitizen.com/climate-change/sacks-gardening-in-urban-and-rural-areas_a-13-3394.html

In every developing country people are suffering from the high food prices. More than billion people are hungry every day. The creation of small-scale kitchen gardens and container gardening are the most efficient tools to provide fresh food to rural farmers and urban people. Growing food in sacks is an interesting variant of container gardening.

Smallholders and rural producers have a vital role to play in overcoming global hunger and poverty, and new and varied partnerships are needed, with particular emphasis on the interests of women, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said on February 17th, 2010.  He also confirmed that the growing international recognition of the role of agriculture and rural development in poverty reduction is helping to build the Global Partnership for Agriculture, Food Security…

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Emergent and small-scale farmers face constraints that limit their profitability

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Small-scale soya farming can outperform large-scale agricultural investments

Read the full article: IIED

Agriculture is an important engine for economic growth in Africa, but effective agricultural strategies to support rural development and poverty alleviation are scarce. State investment in the small-scale farming sector is minimal and the entrepreneurial family farm sector remains underrepresented. Meanwhile, large-scale land investments are advocated as means to bring capital to rural areas and stimulate development. However, the investigation of soya production in Central Mozambique presented here suggests small-scale farming can produce similar profits to large-scale operations and better social outcomes. Concentrating only on large-scale investments can mean forgoing opportunities for rural development and poverty reduction. With the right support, poorer households can develop market-oriented farming that contributes to local value chains at many levels.

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Offering information technologies tailored to developing world farmers

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Photo credit: FAO

The ubiquitous cellphone can connect farmers to a range of information and tools.

More support to family farmers needed to meet world’s rising food demands, FAO tells G20

FAO Director-General calls for information technologies tailored to developing world farmers at ministerial meeting

In an era in which challenges like climate change and natural resource scarcity are making agriculture ever more knowledge-intensive, family farmers in the developing world need information and technology tools that can help them not just get by, but thrive and feed a growing world population, FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva said today.

“Millions of small family farmers need technical and financial assistance to be more resilient and adapt to the impacts of climate change. They must be able to stay on their land, produce their own food and also have access to markets,” he said in remarks at the G20 agricultural ministers meeting

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How to FERTILIZE DRY AND BARREN SOIL IN AGRICULTURE

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fb_img_14866445679861 Fruitful curly red chili trees on fine soil. Photo by: http://www.hallogarden.comhttp://www.hallogarden.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/FB_IMG_14866445679861.jpg

4 WAYS TO FERTILIZE DRY AND BARREN SOIL IN AGRICULTURE

http://www.hallogarden.com/2017/02/4-ways-fertilize-dry-barren-soil-agriculture/

Soil is a media most frequently used by farmers to plant various types of crops. However, there are other kinds of farming that doesn’t use as their media for example hydroponic farming, aquaponics farming, etc.

In soil, we can find a lot of important nutrients to protect so they can be beneficial for plants around the area. Most of the times, dry, barren soil tend to get left as it is, dry and barren. This causes the nutrients in it to diminish due to the lack of proper care and optimized use. So, if you find land around you with dry and barren soil, it is best for you to optimize it by planting various vegetables and fruits and making your own garden.

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Camel Manure~Some Feedback from the Different Quarters of the World

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Cultivation of improved legumes and cereals

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Photo credit: ICRISAT

Farmers and project members inspecting green gram crop. Photo: Egerton University

INCREASING FARM PRODUCTIVITY IN KENYA THROUGH CULTIVATION OF IMPROVED LEGUMES AND CEREALS

In a span of one year, 300 farmers in Kerio valley in Kenya earned over KES 4.8 million (USD 46,978) by cultivating 44.5 ha of green grams and over KES 4.2 million (USD 41,106) through cultivation of 161.8 ha of groundnuts.

These farmers were trained in increasing productivity of dense legumes (groundnuts, green grams) and cereals (millets and sorghum). High quality seeds of green grams and groundnuts mainly KS20 variety, CG 7, and ICGV 90704 that are well adapted to hot dry areas of Kerio valley were released to farmers. Farmers were trained on improved planting practices. Prior to this, farmers used to plant less seed (4 kgs per 0.4 ha instead of 8 kgs per 0.4 ha) which reduced their yield to 3-4…

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New approaches to irrigation will need to be developed to adapt agriculture

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Photo credit: UN NEWS CENTRE

Photo: FAO/Giulio Napolitano

Future of food security depends on irrigation methods that adapt to climate change – UN agency

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has warned that in order to adapt agriculture to a changing climate, new approaches to irrigation will need to be developed and implemented worldwide.

These new approaches are being discussed as part of the 2nd World Irrigation Forum which opened yesterday in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and brings together stakeholders from around the world to rethink water management in the context of continued population and economic growth as well as the growing threats of climate change.

During the Forum, which wraps up on 12 November, experts will also discuss ways to improve water management in order to achieve global sustainable food security.

FAO emphasized in a news release that in order to achieve food security, especially in…

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