Innovative cassava peels processing factories launched in Nigeria

ILRI Clippings

Peeling cassava rootsPeeling cassava roots (credit: IITA).

New factories that will transform cassava peels into high-quality feed for livestock have been launched in Nigeria.

The huge potential for use of cassava peel as fodder in Nigeria was first proposed by three CGIAR centres. Researchers from the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) and the International Potato Center (CIP), with the support of CGIAR Research Programs on Roots, Tubers and Bananas, Humidtropics, and Livestock and Fish, showed that drying and grading cassava peels could hold the key to providing a readily available and sustainable source of animal feeds, increasing incomes for women and boosting food security in West Africa.

The new cassava peel processing initiative is supported by Synergos Nigeria, federal and state governments, the World Bank, Fadama III, the Kogi State University, and ILRI Nigeria in Ibadan. ILRI organized…

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Just a reminder: The role of urban gardens, family gardens and school gardens.

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My publication in January 2010:

https://containergardening.wordpress.com/2010/01/19/the-role-of-urban-gardens-family-gardens-and-school-gardens-willem-van-cotthem-irin-fao/

by Prof. Dr. Willem Van Cotthem (Ghent University, Belgium)

The role of urban gardens, family gardens and school gardens (Willem Van Cotthem / IRIN / FAO)

For years we have been promoting family gardens (kitchen gardens) and school gardens, not to mention hospital gardens, in the debate on alleviation of hunger and poverty.  We have always insisted on the fact that development aid should concentrate on initiatives to boost food security through family gardens instead of food aid on which the recipients remain dependent. Since the nineties we have shown that community gardens in rural villages, family gardens in refugee camps and school gardens, where people and children grow their own produce, are better off than those who received food from aid organizations at regular intervals.

2007 – Family garden in Smara refugee camp (S.W. Algeria, Sahara desert), where people never before got local fresh…

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Supporting smallholders and family farmers, reducing pesticide and chemical use, and improving land conservation practices

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Photo credit: FAO

High-input, resource intensive farming systems have substantially increased food production, but at a high cost to the environment.

Increasing food production without damaging the environment

FAO Director-General addresses European Parliament’s Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development

To achieve sustainable development we must transform current agriculture and food systems, including by supporting smallholders and family farmers, reducing pesticide and chemical use, and improving land conservation practices, FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva said today addressing European lawmakers.

“Massive agriculture intensification is contributing to increased deforestation, water scarcity, soil depletion and the level of greenhouse gas emission,” Graziano da Silva said. He stressed that while high-input and resource intensive farming systems have substantially increased food production, this has come at a high cost to the environment.

“Today, it is fundamental not only to increase production, but to do it in a way that does not damage the environment. Nourishing…

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Doubling Farmer Incomes in Five Years

THE GFAR BLOG

farmers CCAFSAjit Maru,  GFAR’s Senior Officer, reports on his participation in an interesting workshop in India where GFAR’s and APAARI’s primary objective of transforming agricultural research and innovation systems was illustrated in practice by SDAU, a GFAR and APAARI partner!

How to double real incomes of smallholder family farmers and marginal farmers who have less than a hectare of land by 2022? This was the challenge discussed at a Workshop organized by the Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University (SDAU) in Gujarat, India on 18-19 April 2017. SDAU is a partner in GFAR and also an APAARI partner and is developing and implementing a multi-stakeholder collective action on further developing agriculture in the parched, semi-arid, arid and desert lands of the 7 districts of North Gujarat. These districts are the agricultural development responsibility of the University.

The smallholder and marginal farmers of North Gujarat have an average land holding just above 1 hectare…

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Small-scale kitchen gardens and container gardening are the most efficient tools to provide fresh food

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Sacks gardening in urban and rural areas

Published on 25 Feb, 2010 12:22 pm

by Prof. Dr. Willem Van Cotthem – Ghent University (Belgium)

http://scitizen.com/climate-change/sacks-gardening-in-urban-and-rural-areas_a-13-3394.html

In every developing country people are suffering from the high food prices. More than billion people are hungry every day. The creation of small-scale kitchen gardens and container gardening are the most efficient tools to provide fresh food to rural farmers and urban people. Growing food in sacks is an interesting variant of container gardening.

Smallholders and rural producers have a vital role to play in overcoming global hunger and poverty, and new and varied partnerships are needed, with particular emphasis on the interests of women, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said on February 17th, 2010.  He also confirmed that the growing international recognition of the role of agriculture and rural development in poverty reduction is helping to build the Global Partnership for Agriculture, Food Security…

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Emergent and small-scale farmers face constraints that limit their profitability

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Screen Shot 2017-03-12 at 21.13.32

Small-scale soya farming can outperform large-scale agricultural investments

Read the full article: IIED

Agriculture is an important engine for economic growth in Africa, but effective agricultural strategies to support rural development and poverty alleviation are scarce. State investment in the small-scale farming sector is minimal and the entrepreneurial family farm sector remains underrepresented. Meanwhile, large-scale land investments are advocated as means to bring capital to rural areas and stimulate development. However, the investigation of soya production in Central Mozambique presented here suggests small-scale farming can produce similar profits to large-scale operations and better social outcomes. Concentrating only on large-scale investments can mean forgoing opportunities for rural development and poverty reduction. With the right support, poorer households can develop market-oriented farming that contributes to local value chains at many levels.

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Offering information technologies tailored to developing world farmers

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Photo credit: FAO

The ubiquitous cellphone can connect farmers to a range of information and tools.

More support to family farmers needed to meet world’s rising food demands, FAO tells G20

FAO Director-General calls for information technologies tailored to developing world farmers at ministerial meeting

In an era in which challenges like climate change and natural resource scarcity are making agriculture ever more knowledge-intensive, family farmers in the developing world need information and technology tools that can help them not just get by, but thrive and feed a growing world population, FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva said today.

“Millions of small family farmers need technical and financial assistance to be more resilient and adapt to the impacts of climate change. They must be able to stay on their land, produce their own food and also have access to markets,” he said in remarks at the G20 agricultural ministers meeting

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